The Boat

"The Boat" 2014 Acrylic and enamel on board 98 x 138 cm

“The Boat” 2014 Acrylic and enamel on board 98 x 138 cm

The image of the boat has been a recurring theme in my painting for two years. Imagining the claustrophobic hull – the hell of uncertainty. I worked night shift earlier in the year with a young man who made such a journey in 2001. Although only 8 years old at the time, he vividly described three nights jammed in with asylum seekers from a variety of countries, sharing the same goal and the same fear in the wilderness of hours huddled together clutching make shift weapons. They had no idea where they were headed, but for Jamil, fleeing recruitment by the Taliban in Afghanistan, anywhere was a better option than the home he had known. For his parents returning to the motherland remains desirable if not attainable as yet, but not for Jamil, having grown up in Australia, he is now an Aussie, studying medical science at uni, contemplating a gap year, and working shifts to top up the coffers. The idea of returning to Afghanistan now seems foreign, although he wears his ‘boat person’ badge with honor and a wry smile.

"Boat" 201440 x 60 cm enamel on paper

“Boat” 201440 x 60 cm enamel on paper

"Boat" Acrylic on board 60 x 80 cm 2014

“Boat” Acrylic on board 60 x 80 cm 2014

"Voyage" 2013 spray enamel and gouache on paper 100 x 192cm

“Voyage” 2013 spray enamel and gouache on paper 100 x 192cm

"Seeking Asylum"  (bus stop paste-up) Stencil August 2013

“Seeking Asylum” (bus stop paste-up) Stencil August 2013

"Boat" 2013

“Boat” 2013 100 x 192 cm

'Voyage No.2" 2013 spray enamel & gouache on paper 50 x 64 cm

‘Voyage No.2″ 2013 spray enamel & gouache on paper 50 x 64 cm

DSC_7948

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3 Comments on “The Boat

  1. Those boats are a bunch of branches held together by chewing gum. It’s extremely traumatic and painful, crowded like a sardine box and circled by sharks that can easily leap on the boat and take whoever they want… Those people show up starved and sometimes dehydrated.

    Common sense dictates that anyone who takes his life in his hands and goes through this nightmare must be desperate and terrified, and therefore a genuine refugee. Work migrants would never do that. The reason only 90% of those arriving by boats are declared refugees is because the government isn’t fair or honest. They are all refugees, and none of them had a choice.

    • Yes I agree, but it would seem the majority of Australians are not so understanding. I got sick of getting mad at the TV screen, and decided to vent my frustration in the best way I know. Somebody said the other day, that this is the “Vietnam” of our generation. Thanks for the comment…

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